Managing Analyst

Ken Clipperton pencil sketchKen Clipperton is a Managing Analyst at DCIG, a group of analysts with IT industry expertise who provide informed, insightful, third party analysis and commentary on IT hardware, software and services. Within the data center, DCIG has a special focus on the enterprise data storage and electronically stored information (ESI) industries.

Ken joined DCIG in August 2012, bringing more than 20 years of information technology experience to the team. Prior roles include server administrator, systems analyst, and then IT director at a series of three private universities. Ken has served on multiple corporate advisory boards, state-wide technology commissions and national user group boards; and presented at many national and regional technology conferences.

Throughout his career, Ken has specialized in evaluating and implementing innovative technologies to address operational, tactical and strategic business priorities. For example, Ken was a key leader in the creation of the world’s first comprehensive wireless community at Buena Vista University, a project called eBVyou that became a national model and drew visiting teams from hundreds of colleges, universities and K-12 school districts.

Ken earned his MBA in Management Information Systems from Metropolitan State University, St. Paul, MN and a BA in History from Crown College.

 Latest Posts

All-inclusive Licensing is All the Rage in All-flash Arrays

Early in my IT career, a friend who owns a software company told me he had been informed by a peer that he wasn’t charging enough for his software. This peer advised him to adopt a “flinch-based” approach to pricing. He said my friend should start with a base licensing cost that meets margin requirements, and then keep adding on other costs until the prospective customer flinches. My friend found that approach offensive, and so do I.

0 comments

Why Tiering and Quality of Service Matter in All-Flash Array Selection

Many organizations are using all-flash arrays in their data centers today. When asked about the benefits they have achieved, two benefits are almost always top of mind. The first benefit mentioned is the increase in application performance. Indeed, increased performance was the primary rationale for the purchase of the all-flash array. The second benefit came as an unexpected bonus; the decrease in time spent managing storage. As organizations consolidate many applications on each all-flash array; and are discovering that data tiering and quality of service features are important for preserving these benefits.

0 comments

Keys to Unlocking Business Value in Next-Generation All-Flash Arrays

Next-generation all-flash arrays will provide dramatic improvements in performance and density over the prior generation of all-flash arrays. These new levels of performance and density will bring the benefits of real-time analysis to a whole new set of problems and organizations, creating tremendous value. They will also enable organizations to achieve significant budget savings through a fresh wave of data center consolidations. But unlocking the ability of any next-generation array to deliver these savings depends on a key set of features that enable workload consolidation and simplified management.

0 comments

Four Flash Memory Trends Influencing the Development of Tomorrow’s All-flash Arrays

The annual Flash Memory Summit is where vendors reveal to the world the future of storage technology. Many companies announced innovative products and technical advances at last week’s 2017 Flash Memory Summit that give enterprises a good understanding of what to expect from today’s all-flash products today as well as a glimpse into tomorrow’s products. These previews into the next generation of flash products revealed four flash memory trends sure to influence the development of the next generation of all-flash arrays.

0 comments